Wednesday, 5 September 2018

FW: These new articles for Higher Education Quarterly are availableonline.

 

 

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Cover Image

Higher Education Quarterly

Early View

Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue

Cyberbullying, revenge porn and the mid‐sized university: Victim characteristics, prevalence and students' knowledge of university policy and reporting procedures

Kimberly O'Connor, Michelle Drouin, Jedidiah Davis, Hannah Thompson

Version of Record online: 04 September 2018

Benefit of the doubt approach to assessing the research performance of Australian universities

Andrzej Szuwarzyński

Version of Record online: 04 September 2018

http://el.wiley.com/wf/open?upn=nE9rxSXA5G4kxsTVkgv43h-2Bm-2B9Yo-2B-2Bv7uQWCV8xxkX-2BrLcOHId0EopOjIQdx3Uo5cTre289VeKvAYm9WFxgifCJPmFEuTfVhhzWL3IvuBfxNezFKg9PV-2FgV8Pvlm23Z-2BzFfPYeyqgyqhczvR9ZBOe6A1wVzPWS2hSf7g02U-2FFEheJUGGo9daaTjzXWCJzr7FcpPycgZUb4GmEE4szm8wrk7kY3pLBhV3MkI-2FqLNjChfYcK4g3-2FJ6Ek4XfoCl1IEQh6ArquYsqziiQ0zTO2TG3-2BsW16sMVBf6ykgluEJ-2B-2B6M-3D

 

Thursday, 30 August 2018

Fwd: These new articles for Higher Education Quarterly are available online.




Higher Education Quarterly

Online Version of Record before inclusion in an issue

Expertise and the PhD: Between depth and a flat place
Robyn Barnacle, Christine Schmidt, Denise Cuthbert
Version of Record online: 29 August 2018
The programme director and the Teaching Excellence Framework: How do we train the former to survive the latter?
Ruth Massie
Version of Record online: 21 August 2018
Modelling student migration to Karnataka for Higher Education using a partial least square structural equation model
Sandeep Rao, Veena Andini
Version of Record online: 17 August 2018
Can the performance effect be ignored in the attendance policy discussion?
Kristian J. Sund, Stephane Bignoux
Version of Record online: 17 August 2018
Critical corridor talk: Just gossip or stoic resistance? Unrecognised informal Higher Education leadership
Jill Jameson
Version of Record online: 17 August 2018
Predictive validity of the IELTS in an English as a medium of instruction environment
Kevin Schoepp
Version of Record online: 07 May 2018
What's in a name? The impact of reputation and rankings on the teaching income of English universities
Alison Wolf, Andrew Jenkins
Version of Record online: 19 April 2018
Predictors of student success in Higher Education: Secondary school internal scores versus national exams
José Miguel Cerdeira, Luis Catela Nunes, Ana Balcão Reis, Carmo Seabra
Version of Record online: 14 April 2018
A two‐sided medal: On the complexity of international comparative and collaborative team research
Anna Kosmützky



Wednesday, 15 August 2018

Labour's pedagogic project

http://www.wwwords.co.uk/rss/abstract.asp?j=forum&aid=6392&doi=1

Labour's Pedagogic Project and the Crisis of Social Democracy in the English Labour Party

PATRICK AINLEY
MARTIN ALLEN

pages 87-96
http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.1.87

VIEW FULL TEXT | ISSUE CONTENTS LIST

This article contends that the implementation of government policies is mediated principally by the state, the economy and social class but that these have all changed so markedly since 1945 that education can no longer be seen as having the reforming role attributed to it in the post-war years. The continued assumption that it does means that, were policies based upon Labour's characteristic pedagogic project to be implemented in government, they may well lead to disillusion. This would only contribute to, rather than help resolve, the crisis of social democracy in the British Labour Party.

Saturday, 11 August 2018

Fwd: New TOC: LATISS (Vol. 11, Issue 1: Contextualising Student Engagement)





This special issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences (LATISS) titled "Contextualising student engagement: The case of recent reform in United Kingdom higher education" focuses on the shift in policy and discourse in the post-Browne Review era, exploring institutional change and everyday experience, and reflecting on the power and limits of policies.

Please visit the Berghahn website for more information about the journal: www.berghahnjournals.com/latiss

Current Issue: Volume 11, Issue 1
Contextualising student engagement: The case of recent reform in United Kingdom higher education
Guest Editors: Lisa Garforth and Anselma Gallinat

Introduction
Introduction: Constructing and practising student engagement in changing institutional cultures
Lisa Garforth and Anselma Gallinat
http://bit.ly/2Nq8MVa

Articles
Invisible labour: Do we need to reoccupy student engagement policy?
Sarah Hayes
http://bit.ly/2uxNnlR

Student engagement in the management of accelerated change: Anthropological reflections on 'Project 2012' and The Offer
Anselma Gallinat
http://bit.ly/2zZttph

Enhancing student engagement through effective 'customer' evaluation: Quis custodiet ipsos consumptores?
Geoff Payne
http://bit.ly/2uxkJRY

Unreasonable rage, disobedient dissent: The social construction of student activists and the limits of student engagement
Jessica Gagnon
http://bit.ly/2uLucEz

Tactics and strategies to survive 'student engagement', or joining the Soil Society and other stories: A panel discussion
Jacqui Close
http://bit.ly/2LpuQP1

Be sure to recommend Learning and Teaching to your institution's library: http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/latiss/library-recommendations/

Free Sample Issue: http://journals.berghahnbooks.com/latiss/sample/

Contact: info@berghahnjournals.com



Friday, 3 August 2018

Fwd: [New post] A Satire on Academic Politics






Iain M posted: "Cornford's 'Microcosmographia Academica' (1908) remains my favourite satire on academic politics. For those unfamiliar with it, it takes the form of being a guide to the young academic interested in gaining influence, and contains the warning, "...and may"

New post on The World of Edrith

A Satire on Academic Politics

by Iain M

Cornford's 'Microcosmographia Academica' (1908) remains my favourite satire on academic politics. For those unfamiliar with it, it takes the form of being a guide to the young academic interested in gaining influence, and contains the warning, "...and may your soul (if you have a soul) find mercy!" Despite being a little dated in parts, it […]

Read more of this post

Comment    See all comments




Monday, 30 July 2018

Fwd: New Issue: Learning and Teaching (Vol.11, Issue 1) - Contextualising Student Engagement








Dear Colleague,

This special issue of Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences (LATISS) titled "Contextualising student engagement: The case of recent reform in United Kingdom higher education" focuses on the shift in policy and discourse in the post-Browne Review era, exploring institutional change and everyday experience, and reflecting on the power and limits of policies.

Editors: 
Penny Welch, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wolverhampton 
Susan Wright, Danish School of Education, University of Aarhus

Contextualising student engagement:
The case of recent reform in United Kingdom higher education
Guest Editors: Lisa Garforth and Anselma Gallinat

Introduction

Articles







Berghahn Books Inc., 20 Jay Street Suite 512, Brooklyn, NY 11201
Sent by lindsay.lamoore@berghahnbooks.com in collaboration with
Constant Contact

Educational Developments Issue 18.1

Educational Developments Issue 18.1 - 2017 now available to download from the SEDA.ac.uk website

Page 1: SWEET strategies for developers working in the third space Rhona Sharpe

Page 5: Action Learning for Academic Development: Learning from experience in two different research-intensive settings Claire Stocks, Joseph Hughes and Chris Trevitt

Page 10: 'Can we find five minutes for a chat?': Fostering effective dialogue between educational developers and leaders of learning and teaching in universities Sally Brown and Shân Wareing

Page 13: Whatever happened to Programme Assessment Strategies? Ruth Withfield and Peter Hartley

Page 19: How can we ensure students can participate in a dialogue around teaching and learning in the complex landscape of contemporary HE? Rebecca Turner and Ellie Russell

Page 21: Structured peer feedback between universities - Learning from the REACT project Tom Lowe, Elisabeth Dunne, Stuart Sims and Wilko Luebsen

Page 24: Everything and nothing: Capturing hearts, minds and credit at the Royal College of ArtChris Mitchell

Page 28: SEDA News

Sunday, 22 July 2018

With or without U? Assemblage theory and (de)territorialising the university

https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/F5xt4TewPSeTwp4ftiqj/full

An interesting article looking at the nature of universities, particularly in relation to boundaries  using Assemblage theory and looking at examples of use of social media to which we could add the treatment of @pryamvadagopal on the UK.

Good

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

FW: LJMU Innovations in Practice

 

The latest issue of Innovations in Practice was released last month.  The issue’s papers include a diverse range of topics, including column pieces on student volunteering, embedding enterprise education, small group-working and study abroad. The issue also features a reflective essay on SoTL and ‘in-house’ journals, reviews and a ‘sector round-up’ of ‘grey literature’ in the first half of the academic year.

 

Innovations in Practice, Volume 12, No. 1 - http://openjournals.ljmu.ac.uk/index.php/iip/issue/view/41

 

The journal is still ‘a work in progress’ and any feedback (including any tips) would be really welcomed.

 

Please direct any comments to Virendra Mistry, (Editor, Innovations in Practice), at v.mistry@ljmu.ac.uk

 

Thank you

 

Rachel

 

Liverpool John Moores University

Rachel Boulter
Academic Professional Development Officer
Teaching and Learning Academy
Exchange Station, Tithebarn St, Liverpool, L2 2QP
t: 01512318666 e: R.M.Boulter@ljmu.ac.uk

 

 


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Tuesday, 17 July 2018

New book on Academic work and governance

Richard Hall on his latest book, The Alienated Academic: https://t.co/4F5CVGb6ku

FW: New OnlineFirst articles available for Journal of Research in International Education

 

These new articles for Journal of Research in International Education are available online

View online

OnlineFirst Alert

Article

International students' transitions to UK Higher Education – revisiting the concept and practice of academic hospitality

Josef Ploner
Jnl of Research in Internatl Education
Jul 11, 2018
| OnlineFirst


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Sunday, 15 July 2018

Higher Education Governance - Oxford bibliography

Higher Education Governance
Michael DobbinsJens Jungblut
  • LAST MODIFIED: 27 JUNE 2018
  • DOI: 10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0203



Introduction

The governance of higher education has been a prominent topic for investigation at least since Burton Clark’s foundational 1983 study on the higher education system (see General Overview and Historical Studies). While there is no universally agreed definition of governance in general or governance in the area of higher education, there are certain characteristics of it that are common to most if not all definitions. First, governance relates to decision-making processes and structures, many of which draw on long-standing historical regulatory models. In Europe and higher education systems influenced by Europe, these include, for example, the Humboldtian tradition of academic self-rule and the Napoleonic state-centered tradition, as well as the Anglo-Saxon model of stronger market-oriented regulation. The structures and decision-making processes inherent in higher education governance also generally entail multiple actors with often diverging interests and especially in higher education regularly take place in a multilevel environment with diverse stakeholders This also relates to the second point, namely that higher education governance addresses supranational, national, regional as well as institutional processes; studies in this area can either focus on one of these levels or cut across several of them. Third, while higher education governance has some sector-specific characteristics it also shares many developments with general public sector governance. This is reflected in the fact that many conceptual approaches used for the study of higher education governance are imported from political science, public administration, public policy, or organizational studies. Finally, higher education governance also has intersections with other research fields, including, for example, higher education policy studies and studies on the political economy or the financing of higher education. As governance tools become more diverse, and since governance arrangements and dynamics are inherently political, it is hard to completely isolate this topic for the purpose of this bibliography. Therefore, a certain overlap or complementarity with other bibliographies, such as the one by William R. Doyle for Oxford Bibliographies in Education “Higher Education Policy,” are inevitable. Our selection of themes is largely pragmatic and aims to cover all crucial dimensions and major themes of higher education governance addressed in academic research. We structure the bibliography along twelve sections starting from more general and conceptual analyses. For the sake of transparency and clarity we focus next on different levels of higher education governance: (1) system-level governance, i.e., state steering of higher education, (2) institutional governance, i.e., university-level administration, and (3) international and multilevel governance. We then address studies on key modern-day issues in higher education governance such as accountability, autonomy, and quality assurance, before presenting a series of theoretically guided analyses on contemporary reform processes. The following segments are then dedicated to the linkages between higher education and the political economy, welfare state, and a diverse array of interest groups. In the end we address developments in specific regions of the world as well as higher education governance in federalist political systems.