Monday, 18 September 2017

FW: REACT Special Issue: Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change

 

REACT project’s Special Issue of the Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change

 

We are delighted to announce the launch of our special issue of the Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change as part of the dissemination of the HEFCE Catalyst funded REACT Project. This journal represents the culmination of the REACT initiative, offering research papers, case studies, opinion pieces associated with REACT collaborative development programme and research. Please do take a moment of your time to have a look at the journal and read some of the exciting work from the institutions across the programme.

 

Vol 3, No 1 (2017): Reacting to the 'Hard to Reach' through Student Engagement Initiatives

This special issue of The Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change is slightly different from previous issues in that it focuses on a particular programme, known as ‘REACT’, funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE). ‘Realising Engagement Through Active Culture Transformation’, or REACT, looks closely at the engagement of so-called ‘hard-to-reach’ students in Higher Education, and this issue of the journal provides a kaleidoscope of views and standpoints, starting points and conclusions, through both qualitative descriptions and reporting of quantitative data.  It is not a ‘recipe book’ for ‘student engagement’. There is no clear-cut, neat picture of what ‘student engagement’ is, nor of what characterises a ‘hard-to-reach’ student. However, overall, it gives a rich picture of the many complexities of engaging with students who are less likely to engage, and of the many ways in which universities are working to understand the issues and consequences and to engage all students more effectively.

In all, forty-four contributions make up this issue, in the form of research articles, case studies and opinion pieces. Much has already been written on the topic of ‘student engagement’, but the importance of this particular set of pieces is that they narrow the focus of ‘student engagement’ by concentrating specifically on ‘hard-to-reach’ students. This does not mean narrowing or ‘closing down’ any aspect of discussion on the topic, but it provides a particular lens with the potential to inform wider debates.

Best wishes

 

Cassie

On behalf of the REACT Team

 

Cassie Shaw | FHEA

Research Officer (Student Engagement)

REACT Researcher

The University of Winchester

MB11

SO22 4NR

T: 01962 675198

 

 
University of Winchester, a private charitable company limited by
guarantee in England and Wales number 5969256.
Registered Office: Sparkford Road, Winchester, Hampshire SO22 
4NR

Friday, 1 September 2017

A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education - free e-book

A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education:



"Is it possible to bring university research and student education into a more connected, more symbiotic relationship? If so, can we develop programmes of study that enable faculty, students and ‘real world’ communities to connect in new ways? In this accessible book, Dilly Fung argues that it is not only possible but also potentially transformational to develop new forms of research-based education. Presenting the Connected Curriculum framework already adopted by UCL, she opens windows onto new initiatives related to, for example, research-based education, internationalisation, the global classroom, interdisciplinarity and public engagement.



 A Connected Curriculum for Higher Education is, however, not just about developing engaging programmes of study. Drawing on the field of philosophical hermeneutics, Fung argues how the Connected Curriculum framework can help to create spaces for critical dialogue abouteducational values, both within and across existing research groups, teaching departments and learning communities. Developing synergies between research and education can empower faculty and students from all backgrounds to engage with diversity and contribute to the global common good by developing people as critical citizens. "



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